ISSN: 2241-6692

Norway (Yannis Veslemes, 2014)

Issue 3, October 2015

edited by Maria Chalkou


ABOUT

Filmicon: Journal of Greek Film Studies is a bilingual (English and Greek), peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal edited primarily by independent scholars and published by ‘Eurasia Publications’, Athens. More

GUEST EDITING

Filmicon warmly welcomes proposals for guest-edited Special Issues on relevant topics provided that they follow the peer review policy of the journal. To submit proposals for guest-edited Special Issues, please check here.

OPEN CALL FOR PAPERS

Filmicon invites a variety of original contributions in either English or Greek (or in both languages): articles, book reviews, film reviews, translations, bibliographies, filmographies, interviews, conference and film festival reports that have not previously appeared in any other published form (print or online). Please note that manuscripts that are under review at any other journal or collective volume cannot be considered. Manuscripts can be submitted at any time. For Special Issues, however, specific deadlines will be announced that will run alongside Filmicon’s open call. To submit a manuscript for consideration, please check here.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Following on from the first International Conference on Balkan Cinema that took place in Athens in 2015, Balkan Cinema on the Crossroads: From Nitrate to Digital aims to explore the trajectory of Balkan cinema from the early nitrate days to the contemporary digital era, by highlighting connections, similarities and comparable patterns across the cinemas of the region. With few exceptions, linguistic and political differences have usually led to nation-based approaches to the cinemas of the region. This series of conferences aims to develop transnational scholarship, transcend Balkanism and exoticism, and offer critical explorations of historical and contemporary manifestations of South Eastern European cinemas. The ambition is both to enlighten the past by proposing new ways of examining the region’s cinema history; and to build foundations for future cross-cultural collaborations and mutual prospects. [...]

NEWS

After the meetings in London (2013) and Seattle (2015), the 3rd Conference on Contemporary Greek Film Cultures addresses the diverse aesthetic, historical, medial, and theoretical connections between moving images and all possible aspects of the ‘documentary.’ In light of the many facets of this key term, the conference does not confine itself to practices or traditions of documentary cinema in Greece. It rather explores the multiple cinematic acts and modes of registering, representing, evidencing, authenticating, certifying, and instructing; it discusses the indexical nature of photography and the digital image, the factual as well as fictional functions of audio-visual recording, the archival status of documentary film in Greece, its ideologies, deceptions, and omissions, the filmic depiction of documentation processes, the documents presented on-screen or lost in the Mediterranean Sea. This thematic focus responds to three interrelated circumstances: [...]

How has the ‘Greek crisis’ mediated the ways in which Greeks conceive of, negotiate and perform their history – however ancient or recent?

The ‘outbreak’ of the financial and socio-political crisis in Greece in 2008 has been interpreted as the end of the Metapolitefsi period that began with the collapse of the military dictatorship in July 1974. The rise of the neo-Nazi organisation Golden Dawn has been accompanied by an upswing in discourses and politics of racial eugenics, and a revived use (and, most ominously, the exploitation) of the national traumas of the Civil War to articulate political polarizations and civil strife in Greece. Meanwhile, as the death toll of the humanitarian refugee crisis in the Aegean mounts every day, memories of Greek expatriation and of the Asia Minor population exchange are invoked under the slogan “We are all Refugees”. In light of the growth and increased visibility of Muslim communities in Greece, the SYRIZA government promises to build the first mosque in Athens any day now (despite the protestations of the heads of the Greek Orthodox Church). In the meantime, Athens remains the only EU capital without an official place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. [...]

‘The realm of the dead is as extensive as the storage and transmission capabilities of a given culture,’ writes the German media theorist Friedrich Kittler in Gramophone, Film, Typewriter (originally published in 1986). The emergence since the 1970s of electronic and knowledge-based technologies, and more specifically of digital media, has brought to the fore the close link that exists between media, knowledge, and perception, a link generating both exhilaration and anxiety. The centrality of media, however, to epistemological debates around the ways in which knowledge is produced, stored, and disseminated has a long history in Western thought. Under the banners of media history, media archaeology, and cultural transmission, important work has been undertaken in recent years on the history of media since the Renaissance and on persistent tropes in media discourse that make it possible to set current debates about digital media in a broader historical and theoretical context. One of the most complex and multifaceted case studies in the history of media in the West yet to receive systematic examination has to do with the arts of ancient Greece and Rome. What is the role of media (new and old, material and spiritual, perceptible and imperceptible) in the formation and reproduction of Greco-Roman arts and more broadly in what might be called the transmission of ‘classical’ culture? [...]

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